Monday, July 27, 2020

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Feel Free to Unsubscribe, Unfollow We started this site to add value to other peoples lives. When we embarked on our journey and began simplifying our lives a few years ago, we discovered myriad benefits, and we realized we weren’t the only people who would benefit from the simpler life. So we started sharing our story, and we discovered something amazing: when you add value to people’s lives, they are eager to share your message with their friends and family. When something resonates, we share it: people are intrinsically wired to share value with others; adding value is a basic human instinct. Thanks to the power of sharing, this site has grown to more than four million readers. And the site continues to grow today. Hundreds of thousands of people subscribe via email, and they follow our inspirational messages on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Were grateful for every person who reads our content, finds worth in our words, and shares our message. We appreciate you; we want you here. We dont, however, want anyone to feel obligated to support our site if they dont continue to find value here. We understand that our message will not resonate with everyone. So if you stop finding value in our words, feel free to unsubscribe or unfollow. You wont hurt our feelings. Scouts honor. Wed rather you spend your time and attention on something that adds value to your life. We want you to be happy, and so the last thing we want to do is add to the clutter. This rule shouldn’t apply to only our website, though: no one needs to be offended when someone ‘unfriends’ them on Facebook, or stops following them on Twitter. But unfortunately, many people feel hurt, disrespected, or disregarded when someone leaves their online social circle. Instead of feeling offendedâ€"instead of questioning the other person’s intentionsâ€"we must realize we can’t add value to everyone’s lives all the time: even though someone found value in us previously, that doesn’t mean they will find value now or in the future. People often grow in different directionsâ€"that’s the beauty of life. That said, if you do find merit in our words here at The Minimalists, then please continue to share our essays via email and social media (you can find a list of our most popular essays here). Help us spread the wordâ€"we appreciate the love. Thank you for being part of a movement that is bigger than any one person.

Friday, May 22, 2020

Important Discoveries And Contributions That Were Made By...

Abstract: - The many concepts we currently have in the field of mathematics are thanks to great mathematicians from different cultures throughout time. An important era when great mathematical discoveries were made was during Medieval Times, or the Middle Ages. In this paper we discuss important discoveries and contributions that were made by three famous mathematicians of this time period including French Nicole Oresme, German Jordanus Nemorarius and Italian Leonardo Pisano, better known for his nickname of Fibonacci. Key-Words: - Medieval, Mathematics, Fibonacci, Arithmetic, Sequence 1 Introduction Mathematics has grown and expanded its many concepts thanks to mathematicians from different societies throughout time. A very important era in history is considered to be the Medieval Times, or the middle ages. According to reference [6], â€Å"People use the phrase ‘Middle Ages’ to describe Europe between the fall of Rome in 476 CE and the beginning of the Renaissance in the 14th century.† The Middle Ages, or Medieval Times, are known for their famous art, architecture, crusades among other things, but there were also mathematical contributions happening during this time period. Mathematical concepts that we know and use nowadays are thanks to contributions made from different mathematicians throughout time. The Medieval Times are no exception since great men living in this era contributed to the beautiful subject of mathematics. Some of the many intelligent minds from this eraShow MoreRelatedGreat Events and Contributors in the Field of Mathematics918 Words   |  4 Pagesabout various inventions and discoveries especially in the mathematics field. There were various people who made great contributions to the mathematics field which are applicable and still in use to date. This paper will therefore look at two among the many great events and the contributors of the events in the mathematics field. About 250BC there were various inventions and contributions by Archimedes who was considered as being among the greatest mathematicians in history. He is still honoredRead MorePhysics 11373 Words   |  6 PagesThough his most notable discoveries were in the field of astronomy, we cannot label him simply as an astronomer. He authored many important works including, Sidereal Messenger (also known as Starry Messenger), but unfortunately, due to the power of the Catholic church in his native Italy, his work in astronomy was widely rejected by his countrymen. His contributions to physics also place him in the ranks of the greatest scientists of all time. Without Galileo’s contributions to astronomy, mathematicsRead MoreThe Contribution Of Leonhard Euler1712 Words   |  7 Pagesfascinating and talented man who made significant contributions in mathematics, physics, engineering and astronomy (Stockstill). The incredible amount of work he produced in mathematics has made his name famous around the globe. He has produced more work than any other professional in mathematics (Australian Mathematics). His work in calculus, graph theory, and mathematical notation has greatly influenced mathematics (Euler Website). Euler was a great 18th-century mathematician but also worked in music theoryRead MoreCompilation of Mathematicians and Their Contributions11615 Words   |  47 PagesI. Greek Mathematicians Thales of Miletus Birthdate: 624 B.C. Died: 547-546 B. C. Nationality: Greek Title: Regarded as â€Å"Father of Science† Contributions: * He is credited with the first use of deductive reasoning applied to geometry. * Discovery that a circle is  bisected  by its diameter, that the base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal and that  vertical angles  are equal. * Accredited with foundation of the Ionian school of Mathematics that was a centre of learning and researchRead MoreGreece s Impact On The World1360 Words   |  6 PagesKratos-power, which, in literal, means power to the people. Athenian democracy was established as a result of continuous reorganizations with a concept in mind of individual rights for citizens. An excellent quality of the Athenian democracy was that citizens were elected annually and allowed to further a longer term unless an awry situation, then an abrupt change of government can be acted upon on. Direct democracy helped the citizens of Athens to develop intellectually, and broaden their minds, and culturalRead More Mileva Marić Einstein and her contribution to Albert Einsteins work1293 Words   |  6 Pagesmost important papers of his career, and won the 1921 Nobel Prize for that work. He spent the last 30 years of his life working on a unified field theory, but never succeeded. He was never again as successful as when he was with Mileva. Albert Einstein was born in 1879 in Germany and died in 1955 in USA. Albert Einstein won the 1921 Nobel Prize for physics for his services to theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of photoelectric effect. The most important yearRead MoreStanding On The Shoulders Of Giants999 Words   |  4 Pagesthe shoulders of giants† is a very common phrase heard in regards to the scientific community. New and modern works and discoveries are always based on the findings of those that came before them. Even if work done in the past has been proven to be wrong, they still laid the foundation for future scientists to revise their information and improve upon it. One of the most famous and well-known scientists of the times was Leonardo Da Vinci. Da Vinci was born April 15th, 1452 in Italy, by the full nameRead MorePythogoras of Samos Essay examples1350 Words   |  6 Pages Pythagoras of Samos is often described as the first pure mathematician. He is an extremely important figure in the development of mathematics yet we know little about his achievements. There is nothing that is truly accurate pertaining to Pythagorass writings. Today Pythagoras is certainly a mysterious figure. Little is known of Pythagorass childhood. Pythagorass father was Mnesarchus, and his mother was Pythais. Mnesarchus was a merchant who came from Tyre. Pythais was a native of Samos. AsRead MoreThe Life Of Albert Einstein923 Words   |  4 Pagesgraduated from the Federal Polytechnic School. Soon after that, he became a Swiss citizen, but was unable to find a teaching position, so he accepted a job offer as a technical assistant in the Swiss Patent Office (â€Å"Albert Einstein – Biographical†). Three years later, Einstein and Maric finally get married, and in 1904, they celebrate the new life of their son, Hans Albert (Time Line of Albert Einstein s Life). Since Einstein had plenty of free time at the office, he dedicated that time to beginRead MoreCommon Laboratory Operations5997 Words   |  24 PagesList of the entire famous scientist Alessandro Volta(1745-1827) An Italian Physicist who was a pioneer in the development of electricity. He created the first electric battery in 1800. This battery gave the world its first continuous, reliable source of electric current, and led to all important discoveries of the use of electricity. The unit of measuring electromotive force (emf), Volt(v) is named after him. He also proposed the law that the air expands at a constant rate with increasing temperature

Saturday, May 9, 2020

Death of a Salesman - 915 Words

Define The American Dream. In what way does Death of a Salesman point out the hopelessness of chasing this dream? Are there any rewards? The idea of the American Dream is truly subjective. To some, it is living in the lap of luxury in all aspects. To others, it is a chance at a better brighter opportunity for themselves or their families. Arthur Millers Death of a Salesman portrays the promise of the American Dream in the form of opportunity, freedom, success and wealth; the ability to acquire all material comforts in American Life, and sacrifices one must make in order to achieve it. For Willy Loman, hard work could not earn him everything that he wanted or thought he deserved. Willy judged life in terms of material wealth.†¦show more content†¦Once again, Willy chooses his fixation on the American Dream, over his marriage and children. Willie lived to pursue the American dream rather than just live it simplistically, and organically. â€Å"Death of A Salesman† puts an immense amount of pressure on its main character. This dream, this idea of true happiness and success is similar to dangling a carrot in the face or a horse. The horse may give chase, running far and fast, but never reaches its intended goal. Willy Loman held onto a dream, and did everything and anything to reach it; even at the expense of his marriage and family. His demise was Rivera 4 tragic and unfortunate, and a result of a consumer oriented society in which he was never able to fit in. He has lost sight of achieving the true goal of the American Dream; happiness and freedom. Willy has made quite an effort in attempt to achieve this goal, such as having an affair, a life away from his family, all of which sent him on a crash course headed for disaster. All of this is proof that living out this American Dream, will never be a reality, unless we live in reality. To chase a dream is hopeless; you must work hard and earn your keep to achieve it, like everybody else. Upon doing so, it is possible to reap the benefits, and collect your reward no matter how tangible or intangeable they may be.Show MoreRelatedThe Death Of A Salesman1496 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction Today, the play The Death of a Salesman is celebrated in many theatres. The play is regarded as one of the finest dramas of American theater play. It was written in 1949 by an American playwright Arthur Miller. After the play was produced, it was first opened at the Morosco Theatre and starred Lee J Cobb as Willy Loman, Cameron Mitchell as Happy, Mildred Dunnock as Linda, Howard Smith as Charley and Arthur Kennedy as Biff. The play has been revived on Broadway four times and won manyRead MoreThe Death Of A Salesman857 Words   |  4 PagesSome stories have stood the test of time. These stories are relatable are leave readers feared perplexed. Oedipus the King is the tragic story of a man whose figurative blindness at a young age lead to his literal blindness at an old age. The Death of a Salesman converts this to a modern society of a man who just wants to do good for his family but doesn t see the effect of his actions. Although 2400 years separate these stories, readers can still relate to both the same. The genre of tragedy is interpretedRead MoreDeath of a Salesman990 Words   |  4 PagesDiscuss â€Å"Death of a Salesman† as a film. How could this film be more film-like? The well known late 1980’s play Death of a Salesman was beautifully crafted and opened my mind up to the reality of some people’s fantasies. When I first began to watch the play, I had immediately noticed that it was a play and not a movie. Usually in a film, there is a hero, heroine, climax, something they are fighting for, and usually (nine times out of ten) a happy, heroic ending. This movie included none, atRead MoreDeath of a Salesman606 Words   |  3 PagesWilly Loman: Victim of the American Dream Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman tells the tale of Willy Loman, a man who falls from the top of the capitalism system in a resonant crash. Being controlled by his fears of the future, and stuck in his memories of the past, Willy fully contributes to his self-victimization by putting little blame on his own mistakes. Although Willy is perceived as selfish, it is important to see that he is misguided. His character is one of a common man, he has neverRead MoreThe, Death Of A Salesman909 Words   |  4 Pagesdesire to be the breadwinners of the family, wish to achieve only success, become unemotional and might take dangerous risk to prove manhood. Many feminist novels, plays or short stories such as Frankenstein, â€Å"A Dollhouse†, â€Å"Yellow Wallpaper†, â€Å"Death of a Salesman† showcase the ill effects of gender roles. Women had to fight to have the same advantages and opportunities that men possess. Before modern times, many people would believe that a woman s place is in the home but now it is common for the modernRead MoreThe Death Of A Salesman1024 Words   |  5 PagesVictoria Gutierrez Professor Gilbreath Drama 10 6 April 2015 1026 Words The Death of A Salesman San Joaquin Delta College presented Arthur Miller s Death of A Salesman on Sunday the twenty-second of March at 2 o clock in the afternoon. This play is about a young man and his father coming to terms with the past and their futures. Willy Loman, an old salesman, is dealing with both financial and health difficulties. He is put under even more pressure when his unsuccessful son, Biff, returnsRead MoreThe Death Of A Salesman859 Words   |  4 PagesThe Death of a Salesman is a heart-wrenching story of a man named Willie, and his fight for economic freedom. The story takes place in 1931, and it starts off with Willie’s faint memory of his father, who was a flute maker and a salesman. Willie is a sixty three-year-old salesman who has work his entire life to achieve the common goal of the American Dream. Nevertheless, while trying to achieve economic freedom he ends up becoming trapped in the process. Willie in a lot of ways, died before his carRead MoreThe Death Of A Salesma n995 Words   |  4 PagesHope Miller’s play, The Death of a Salesman (1949) was about a family, and their struggles for the American dream. The family composition was not unlike that of an average family, a mom, a dad, and two children. Mom, Linda, tended to the house, oversaw the finances, as well as the lives of the remaining family members. Dad, Willy, supported the family as an on-the-road salesman. At first, Willy’s outbursts were confusing, but as I read the outbursts began to unfold the meanings buried in the storylineRead MoreDeath of a Salesman1187 Words   |  5 PagesDeath of a Salesman There are some who would argue that it is precisely the ultra-capitalist mentality of individuals like Willy Loman that has propelled the American Economy to global dominance, but Arthur Miller’s classic work â€Å"Death of a Salesman† begs the question: at what cost? What does it do to a person, this desperate need to â€Å"be number one man?† Each of Willy’s sons draw a different lesson from his life and their assertions about how one should live offer a compelling choice for modernRead MoreDeath of a Salesman1278 Words   |  6 PagesSteve Flatley Flatley 1 Mr. Nevels English 102 June 17, 2010 The Struggle Within There is a complete descent into madness evident in Miller’s â€Å"Death of a Salesman.† The struggle Willy Lowman has come to endure during a life of lies and false hope is portrayed very well by Miller’s use of dialogue, stage comments, prologue, and time and perhaps best shown by the use of dialogue and character interaction. By putting all of these elements to good use Miller paints a perfect picture as

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Free Essays

string(151) " each market as unique and implements a different approach in order to leverage on customer intelligence on its clubcard \(Datamonitor Europe, 2004\)\." ABSTRACT The ultimate objective of most business to customer (B2C) organizations today is to increase on their productivity and revenues through system simplification, organizational potential and incremental improvements. Customer satisfaction is key to achieving this objective. With the continuously tighter global market competition, it has become a necessity for most organizations to focus on their operations in order to increase on their profitability and gain market leadership (Nice group, 2006). We will write a custom essay sample on OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION or any similar topic only for you Order Now Customer service has thus become the main priority for these organizations to retain their market share and increase on their profitability. Operational management plays a key role in ensuring this customer satisfaction. This analysis thus seeks to examine the effectiveness of operational management in ensuring customer satisfaction within a customer facing B2C organization. An in depth case study of Tesco will be used to obtain the relevant data for this analysis. A multi-method strategy will thus be employed involving a quantitative survey through mailed questionnaires to the subordinate employees and semi-structured interviewing of senior managers within Tesco PLC. The interview scripts and survey questionnaires will then be analysed using thematic coding. Finally, conclusion will be drawn based on the findings obtained. INTRODUCTION In the recent years, globalization, information technology, super highway communication and international trade have posed numerous challenges and opportunities to business to customer (B2C) organizations which have resulted in the enhancement of the manufacturing capabilities through the introduction of new facilities, materials, procedures and techniques (Krajewski Ritzman, 2002). Hence managing the production/service system has become a major challenge in the global competitive environment. In order for business organizations to keep abreast with rapid technological changes and globalization impact, these leading edge organizations, both public and private, must have the ability to deal with the dynamic changes. Operational management leads the way for these business organizations to achieve their goals with minimum efforts. Operation management is that aspect of business the handles the production and service systems (Johnston et al, 2003). It is concerned with activities producing goods or involved in the delivery of services required by customers (Johnston et al, 2003). These activities are at the core of any organization and involve management of a vast majority of the organization’s assets, expenditure and its employees (Krajewski Ritzman, 2002). A commonly held misconception is that operation management involves only the manufacturing activities. It should however be noted that services are increasingly important and their contribution to the national economy far outstrips that of the manufacturing. Additionally, the overwhelming employment majority is provided by the service industry (Krajewski Ritzman, 2002). Operations management can therefore be defined as the effective planning, organizing and controlling of an organization’s resources and activities necessary to provide the market with tangible goods and services (Johnston et al, 2003). It thus applies to manufacturing industries, nonprofit organizations and service industries. Often, the main activities of operations management are production, product development and distribution. Related activities include inventory control, managing purchases, logistics, supply chain management, quality control, storage and evaluation processes (Johnston et al, 2003). The focus is mainly on maximizing resources, increasing efficiency and most importantly, ensuring customer satisfaction. Therefore, OM often includes substantial measurement and analysis of the internal processes. With the continuously tighter global market competition, it has become a necessity for most organizations to focus on their operations in order to increase on their profitability and gain market leadership (Nice group, 2006). Customer service has thus become the main priority for these organizations to retain their market share and increase on their profitability. Ultimately, successful operations management is the key to ensuring customer satisfaction by creating more value than the competition. This proposal thus seeks to examine the effectiveness of operational management in achieving better customer satisfaction within a customer facing B2C organisation. PROBLEM STATEMENT The ultimate objective of most business to customer (B2C) organizations today is to increase on their productivity and revenues through system simplification, organizational potential and incremental improvements (Nice group, 2006). Customer satisfaction is thus key to achieving this objectivity. However, most B2C organizations are currently encountering a necessity to respond to the rapidly changing customer preference, needs, tastes and desires (Nice group, 2006). Stiff competition coupled with increasingly changing customer needs has proven to be the endless driver of organizational performance improvement (Nice group, 2006). For these organizations to remain competitive and retain a larger market share in the global market, efficient management of the operating systems, including both the human resources and material management, must be made a priority. RATIONALE FOR SELECTING TESCO AS CASE STUDY The main purpose of this analysis is to examine the efficiency of operational management in ensuring customer satisfaction within a customer facing a B2C organisation. For this purpose, we selected a case study of Tesco PLC to obtain the relevant data for this analysis. Tesco PLC belongs to the retail industry and their principal products mainly include groceries, Consumer goods, telecoms and financial services (Datamonitor Europe, 2004). Tesco is one of the largest British retailers in terms of the global sales and domestic market share. It has over 923 stores and employs more than 240, 000 people (Datamonitor Europe, 2004). Operational management plays a key role to attaining the primary objectives of Tesco. Whether the current operation objective is to increase on profitability or to improve on customer service, the way in which Tesco utilises its resources have significant impact. As a consequence, there have been an increasing number of innovative developments in operations management in Tesco. Tesco recognizes the human elements as a value adding factor; hence the company has heavily invested in continuous professional development of its workforce (Austin, 2004). The plausibility of its operation strategies is also evident through its localizing and multi-formatting efforts to reach the global market (Austin, 2004). The discounter approach has also been useful in establishing strong customer relationships (Nice group, 2006). For its inbound logistics, Tesco has maintained a healthy relationships with its suppliers by importing own and unique systems (Nice group, 2006). Also, for the outbound logistics, the company treats its each market as unique and implements a different approach in order to leverage on customer intelligence on its clubcard (Datamonitor Europe, 2004). You read "OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION" in category "Essay examples" The procurement and distribution of produce are closely monitored and deliveries made through truck fleets (Nice group, 2006). Further, the company keeps track on goods purchased and products likely to be bought in future hence making Tesco as one of the largest databases worldwide. For its supply chain management, Tesco introduced lean management solutions. The company adopted path breaking techniques and systems like point of sales data, continuous replenishment, primary distribution and the RFID technology in order to increase on the efficiency of its supply chain (Austin, 2004). Through its effective supply chain management, Tesco has emerged as a market leader in the retailing industry in UK (Austin, 2004). Clearly, Tesco represents a successful organisation with efficient operational management. It should however be noted that the current expansion of its retail market into Europe and Asian markets have direct implications on operational management (Nice group, 2006). Nonetheless, employing an in depth case study of Tesco, in examining the effectiveness of operational management in ensuring customer satisfaction, meets the objectives of this analysis. RESEARCH AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The primary goal of this analysis is to examine the effectiveness of operational management in achieving better customer satisfaction within a customer facing B2C organization. Specifically, the research would like to accomplish the following objectives: To examine and analyze the operational management of Tesco PLC Understand the role of operational management in the retail industry To infer the correlation between operational management and better customer satisfaction LITERATURE REVIEW INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE Over the past decade the focus of most prior research has shifted significantly but has concentrated predominantly on operations management within B2C organizations. A number of key studies are cited repeatedly in extant literature. Reference to these studies shall be made in this section as most of their contributions still apply to organizational practices today. Also supporting literature review, information for this research will be drawn from various publications and academic journals such as Academy of Management Review and Journal of Operations Management. A REVIEW OF EXTANT LITERATURE Research into operational management has long been a subject of debate in the public discourse (Flynn et al, 1990). Scholars and practitioners have in the past decades complained about the inconsistencies between applications and research into operations management and stressed the need for a field based research (McCutcheon Meredith, 1993). While Cox Ledbetter (1977) found a vast majority of firms in the UK utilizing operations research in operation management, Robey Smith (1973) observed that application of the research findings to real world situations was constrained by the lack of an integrative research. Bufa (1980) noted that we had become experts at defining problems of narrow scope, evaluating the results using a single criterion and building models to represent them. He noted that attention was rarely given to the problems facing practitioners; hence Bufa (1980) called for an operation management research agenda related to the real world. He suggested that results from research into operations management be made understandable and acceptable to practitioners. Buffa further called for continued research in strategic issues such as planning and control, technology, and location analysis among others. Subsequently, Buffa identified capacity planning, positioning and quality control as critical issues that must be addressed by service systems. While surveying four periodicals namely: Management Science, Decision Sciences, International Journal of Production Research and AIIE Transactions; Chase (1980) developed a framework with two dimensions, research orientation and research emphasis, to classify operation management research. He observed that most research in operational management (OM) was not integrative and focused on micro problems. His survey of published articles on OM showed that among the most popular areas for research were work measurement and inventory control. Research in service systems dealt exclusively with micro issues of staff scheduling. Graham Miller (1981), proposed a comprehensive agenda for OM research. Unlike Buffa (1980), this agenda was based on opinions drawn from a panel of practitioners and researchers. Graham and Miller called for OM research in four main areas: service systems, operations control, operations policy and productivity and technology. Graham and Miller recommended the use of case studies and empirical methods to augment traditional methodologies of simulation and modeling. More recently, there has been an increased interest in process design, quality and strategy (Meredith Samson, 2001). The increase is due to improved frequency among journal articles. The current research in quality has taken a more organizational focus unlike the statistical focus noted by Chase (1980). Further, the concept of operational management has revolutionized beyond just the internal production and manufacturing. It now encompasses activities such as product and process design, purchasing, and distribution (Prasad Babbar, 2000). According to Nernesian (2000), operations management is a process that deals with the transformation of raw inputs- materials, labour or capital- into useful goods and services. While this may be true, there is a whole lot dimensions to the operation management arena. However, the main objective of operational management in any organization remains to maximize on resources and improve on customer satisfaction. Customer service is therefore, key to operational management. Slack et al (2004) defines operation strategy as the total pattern of decisions which shape the long term capabilities of any operation and their contribution to the overall strategy. Slack et al (2004) asserts that the objectives of operation management relate to stakeholders interest. In this regard, customer satisfaction is of particular importance to Tesco PLC. In order to ensure customer satisfaction through operational management, Tesco’s operation performance objectives mainly reflect on five aspects namely: quality, speed, cost, dependability and flexibility. As Slack et al (2004) points out, quality is vital for every operation within a B2C organization since it is an important aspect of customer satisfaction. Hence for a grocery retailer like Tesco, quality could mean that stores are clean and tidy, stores are in good condition, staff is friendly, courteous and helpful, and decor is appropriate and attractive. In this regard, Tesco hired staff to be placed into the stores and distribution centers so as to improve on availability and services hence increasing customer satisfaction (Austin, 2004). Additionally, Tesco launched a clubcard which contains customer information hence enabling it to better understand its customers (Austin, 2004). LITERATURE REVIEW SUMMARY There has been a proliferation of empirical research in the area of operations management. Renowned operation management scholars have attempted to focus and direct OM research towards areas of importance and relevance to industry (Wacker, 1998). Clearly, this review has identified that whilst there is an extensive body of publications into operational management, relatively few rigorous and systematic studies have examined the effect of operational management in customer satisfaction. RESEARCH QUESTIONS To develop an efficient operation management, emphasis should be placed on systems approach which stresses on the techniques, concepts and policies essential for effective and economical design, control of manpower, materials, facilities, capital and informational inputs of an organization (Johnston et al, 2003). To guide our research on operational management we will develop the following preposition: To identify the effectiveness of operational management, one should focus on productivity tools such as Manufacturing Resource Planning, Total Quality Control, Simulation and Animation of Production Operations, Just in Time Techniques, Optimized Production Techniques and Decision Support Systems (Johnston et al, 2003). Based on this proposition we develop three research questions: How do these productivity tools increase the efficiency of operational management in Tesco How can operational management be assessed with regard individual performance and productivity of Tesco PLC What is the potential effect of efficient operational management on customer satisfaction METHODOLOGY RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY The study will adapt an intepretivist research philosophy which is characterized by high degree of subjectivity. Intepretivism takes an ideographic approach to the study and requires a more detailed and rigorous analysis (Swamidass, 1991). This particular philosophical approach has been chosen as it allows the researcher to not only observe and learn, but to also actively engage in the discussion on the effectiveness of operational management in ensuring customer satisfaction. Hence the researcher’s knowledge will be closely aligned to that of the participants. Through this particular philosophical approach, the researcher will be able to explore on the subjective meanings that motivate people’s actions and how effective operational management can improve on customer satisfaction. RESEARCH APPROACHES There are generally two major research paradigms often employed in data collection and analysis namely: qualitative and quantitative approaches. Quantitative methods are formal and objective and they involve systematic processes that generate numerical data (Scudder Hill, 1998). Quantitative research is â€Å"used to answer questions about the complex nature of phenomena, often with the purpose of describing and understanding the phenomena from the participants’ point of view† (Scudder Hill, 1998). With quantitative methods the researcher is able to infer the conclusion through assessing participants’ perceptions and views. On the contrary, qualitative approaches are non-numerical and focus on gathering mainly verbal data (Stuart et al, 2002). The qualitative paradigm is based on a constructivist principle: the belief that reality is socially and subjectively constructed (Stuart et al, 2002). When looking at qualitative versus quantitative methods of data collection, it is obvious that there are advantages and disadvantages associated with each methodology. RESEARCH STRATEGY In order to capitalize on the strengths of both approaches and offset on their limitations, a multi method strategy will be employed by the researcher in collecting primary data. A multi-method strategy uses different data collection methods within a single research paradigm (Tashakkori Teddlie, 2003). It involves using more than one method but restricted to the methods selected from one world view. According to Tashakkori Teddlie (2003), a multi-method approach is important as it allows for the triangulation on an issue by employing different data sources in order to approach the research problem from the different viewpoints. A multi-method strategy will thus be employed involving a quantitative survey through mailed questionnaires to the subordinate employees and semi-structured interviewing of senior managers within Tesco PLC. DATA COLLECTION There is need for an integration of the original individual study through primary research with an existing knowledge and previous research. Therefore both primary and secondary data will be employed in data collection. Primary data will be based on questionnaire survey and semi-structured interviewing of retail managers at Tesco. Secondary research will be used alongside with primary research. Secondary data will be drawn from independent sources such as academic journals, published articles, textbooks, and internet sources. A review of the secondary publications will help in defining the agenda for subsequent primary research by suggesting the relevant questions to be asked. Secondary data will be useful in ascertaining, comparing and integrating with primary data for the purpose of comprehensive and logical analysis. DATA ANALYSIS Thematic analysis (Saunders et al, 2009) would be adopted in the analysis of data obtained through primary and secondary sources. The interview scripts and questionnaires will be analyzed using thematic coding. Contemporary research themes in operation management (such as the operation strategy, supply chain management, service operations, performance management and lean methods), which are based on the research objectives, will be adopted in analyzing the results obtained from the interview and questionnaires as well as the relevant data obtained from secondary publications. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY AND GENERALIZABILITY Due to the fact that semi structured interviews with one or several individuals would be involved in the data gathering process, the study may be prone to interview bias or error and respondent bias or error (Saunders et al, 2009). Moreover, Questionnaires are less likely to be valid as some respondents may answer superficially while others may not be willing to answer certain questions. Furthermore, survey as an instrument has been criticized with some researchers citing potential difficulties of survey administration. According to Meredith et al (1989), the efficient and effective implementation and administration of survey significantly influences the achievement of satisfactory responses and the overall success of data generation. In order to improve reliability, validity and generalizability, this study will adopt the following standards To increase the validity of the research findings and evaluation of responses the researcher will triangulate the responses with articles from independent sources such as published articles, academic journals, textbooks, and the internet and operation management reports. In order to improve on the response rate and content validity, the survey will be designed, formulated and implemented in a manner that follows recommendations from various authors. In particular, the recommendations on survey piloting, layout and questionnaire design by Churchill (1991), Dillman (1978) and Conant et al (1990) will be adopted. Questionnaires will also be issued on two separate occasions, and the two sets of responses compared statistically using spearman’s rank correlation for continuous data hence ensuring consistency of the responses. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS Some of the limitations that might be encountered by the researcher are discussed in this section and these include: Time constraints in conducting the research, analysis and interpreting results. Lack of enough resources for completing the research. CONCLUSION With the above taken into account, it can be concluded that this research proposal is of paramount importance. This research will contribute to the profound analysis on the effectiveness of operational management in achieving better customer satisfaction within a customer facing B2C organization. Conclusion will be drawn based on the findings obtained from the study. REFERENCE Amundson, S. D. (1998). Relationships between theory-driven empirical research in operations management and other disciplines. Journal of Operations Management, 16(4), 341-359. Austin.N. (2004), Exceeding expectations global retailer Tesco known for IT vision, http://epsfiles,internec.com/eps_files/eps_articles/Tesco_article_web_pdf, Updated 2005, accessed 25th July 2011 Buffa, E.S., (1980). Research in operations management. Journal of Operations Management 1, 1–8. Chase, R. B. (1980). A classification and evaluation of research in operations management. Journal of Operations Management, 1(1), 9-14. Churchill.G.A (1991), Marketing research: Methodological foundations, London, The Dryden press Conant.J.S, Mokwa.M.P, Varadarajan.P.R Cooke.R.A (1990), strategic types, distinctive marketing competencies and organizational performance: A multiple measures study, Strategic management journal, vol 11, pp.365-383 Cox Ledbetter (1977), The operations management agenda: an update. Journal of Operations Management, 8, 250–262 Datamonitor Europe (2004), Tesco PLC profile 2004, www.datamonitor.com, updated 2006, accessed 25th July 2011 Dillman (1978), Mail and telephone surveys: The total design method, New York, Wiley publishers Flynn, B. B., Sakakibara, S., Schroeder, R. G., Bates, K. A., Flynn, E. J. (1990). Empirical research methods in operations management. Journal of Operations Management, 9(2), 250-284. Johnston.R, Chamber.S, Harisson.A Slack.N (2003), Cases in operational management, London, Prentice hall Krajewski.L.J Ritzman.L.P (2002), operations management, New Jersey, Pearson education Inc. McCutcheon, D. M., Meredith, J. R. (1993). Conducting case study research in operations management. Journal of Operations Management, 11(3), 239-356. Meredith, J. R., Raturi, A., Amoako-Gyampah, K., Kaplan, B. (1989). Alternative research paradigms in operations. Journal of Operations Management, 8(4), 297-326. Meredith.J.R., Samson, D. (2001). Call for papers: Special issue of Journal of Operations Management on case study and field research. Journal of Operations Management, 19(1), 117-118. Miller, J.G., Graham, M.B.W., (1981). Production operations management: agenda for the ’80s. Decision Sciences 12, 547–571. Nice group (2006), Tesco and business systems UK Ltd work together to ensure a consistent approach to quality management, http://www.nice.com/about/success-story.php.id=27, updated 2005, accessed 25th July 2011 Prasad, S., Babbar, S. (2000). International operations management research. Journal of Operations Management, 18(3), 209-247. Robey Smith (1973), An empirical assessment of the perceived relevance and quality of POM-related journals by academicians. Journal of Operations Management, 10, 194–212. Saunders M., Thornhill.A, Mark Lewis.P (2009), Research methods for Business students, 5th edition Scudder, G. D., Hill, C. A. (1998). A review and classification of empirical research in operations management. Journal of Operations Management, 16(1), 91-101. Stuart, F. I., McCutcheon, D. M., Handfield, R. B., McLachlin, R., Samson, D. (2002). Effective case research in operations management: a process perspective. Journal of Operations Management, 20(5), 419-433. Swamidass, P. M. (1991). Empirical science: new frontier in operations management research. Academy of Management Review, 16(4), 793-814. Tashakkori Teddlie (2003), Quantity and Quality in Social Research, London, Routledge Publishers Wacker, J. G. (1998). A definition of theory: research guidelines for different theory-building research methods in operations management. Journal of Operations Management, 16(4), 361-385. How to cite OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION, Essay examples

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

What factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line Essay Example

What factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line Essay From this data we made a hypothesis on what factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line. My hypothesis was that year 10 pupils would be better at estimating both the size of angles and the length of lines than the adults and the year 7 children but adults answers will be closer to the mean on average. To prove this I would have to use the information in the spreadsheet .I first found the mean of angle 1 ,angle2 ,line 1 and line 2 in all of the sample of year ten all of the sample of year seven and all of the sample of the adults because using this I could find the average percentage error of each group because I felt this was essential in trying to prove the hypothesis I made earlier .The means for each were as displayed in the table below:Year 10Year 7AdultsAngle157.7665.4251.25Angle 2142.72141.04147.05Line 13.874.553.6275Line 214.5214.6112.7325At the moment when I produced the data it didnt interpret the data into what I wanted to know bu t I could find using the spreadsheet so first decided to find the percentage error of each group again using the calculation shown in the preliminary testing this was(difference between original and average estimates / actual size/length)* 100But first we thought that in the data there may be rogue results these are called outliers and are values that do not follow the data in a reasonable trend and so can be eliminated using a certain formula that creates upper and lower fences and if values fall outside of these two fences they can be classed as outliers and will be dismissed from the data . To implement this formula we need to find the upper and lower quartiles of the data, so by using Microsoft excel this data was found. The formula to find upper and lower fences to eliminate outliers is as follows:Lower Fence = Lower quartile 1.5 * inter quartile rangeUpper Fence = Upper quartile + 1.5 * inter quartile rangeFrom this we gained our upper and lower fences which wereYear 10Upper FenceLower fenceAngle 173.537.5Angle 2190110Line 15.51.625Line 222.37.7Then we did the same for year 7Year 7Upper FenceLower fenceAngle 192.532.5Angle 220585Line 17.251.25Line 219.57.5And for the adultsAdultsUpper FenceLower fenceAngle 16533Angle 2188.75110.75Line 15.51.625Line 26.87517.675With this data we deleted rogue values which amounted only to three.So now we can find the percentage error without worrying about rogue values influencing what could be a vital difference.Year 10 (%)Year 7 (%)Adults (%)Angle 17.218.96.8Angle 27.99.035.12Line 14.6232Line 216.1716.881.9This gives us an idea of to which group is better at estimating the sizes of angles and the lengths of lines but to see this in another way we can use box plots which are very useful for comparing sets of data from different groups within a certain population. The length of the whiskers can give an indication of how the data is skewed, either positively or negatively. Also the true value can be marked on to compare e ach of the medians to each other. By looking at the box plots , more specifically where the quartiles are marked we can see whether people tended to over estimate or under estimate. If the median is inclined slightly towards the upper quartile then people in that group under estimated more often than not and vice versa.So here are some box plots that compare all the age groups at both angles and lines.From this we see that the adults mean value is closer to the actual value of both angle 1 and angle 2 plus both the values of lines 1 and 2 ,this provides even more evidence to suggest against my hypothesis that years 10 pupils have a better ability at estimating both angles and lines because we have seen this through a percentage error and several box plot diagrams that we gained from using the averages from different groups but to prove my second statement in the prediction that adults estimates would be closer to their mean answer, which effectively means that adults made similar es timates to each other than the year 10 and 7 pupils , I need to use a statistical device called standard deviation this measures the spread of values from the mean, the bigger the value the more the answers are spread from the mean.Angle 1Angle 2Line 1Line 2Year 1011200.952.5Year 715301.53Adults1019.512.4We see the adults standard deviation figure being the smallest for three out of the four categories which proves one of my hypothesis statements correct but the other wrong this is because It was more of a guess than a prediction.Over all the taking all statistical methods used I came to the conclusion that adults were actually better at estimating both angles but it was interesting to see that the adults guesses had a small deviation from the mean (standard deviation) . The year 10 pupils by my calculations were second best ,their percentage errors were either very close to the adults in two out of four cases or dramatically a field from the other angle and line like the other two cases but their was a link between the angle and the line that were quite a bit out from the adult counterparts they were both the larger angles and lines using this information this could of provided another route of investigation to follow but then their was a factor preventing this being time and also looking at the year 7 data they were exactly the opposite to year ten pupils , where as they tended to be further out on the larger values of angle 2 and line 2 ,year 7 tended to be further out on the smaller sets of angle 1 and line 1 so their could have been a connection between this data and their ages or maybe gender but time did not permit us to investigate these fields.If I could reiterate the experiment I would make a more detailed hypothesis inducing me to analyse all possible fields that could of affected a persons ability to estimate the size of angles and lengths of lines an example of this is gender or intelligence but the field that I investigated which was age came out to me with a very clear result , this was that on average the older you are the better you are at estimating the size of an angle and the length of a line ,but we must take into account that we used a random sample of 25% from each group this meant that we could of missed some peoples estimates that could of affected or swayed the results to a different conclusion this could be important. This means the concluding statement may not actually be correct if further investigated with more detail and with more age groups such as year 8 , 9 and 11 but is still correct for the investigation we carried out. What factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line Essay Example What factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line Essay From this data we made a hypothesis on what factors made a person better at estimating the size of an angle or the length of a line. My hypothesis was that year 10 pupils would be better at estimating both the size of angles and the length of lines than the adults and the year 7 children but adults answers will be closer to the mean on average. To prove this I would have to use the information in the spreadsheet .I first found the mean of angle 1 ,angle2 ,line 1 and line 2 in all of the sample of year ten all of the sample of year seven and all of the sample of the adults because using this I could find the average percentage error of each group because I felt this was essential in trying to prove the hypothesis I made earlier .The means for each were as displayed in the table below:Year 10Year 7AdultsAngle157.7665.4251.25Angle 2142.72141.04147.05Line 13.874.553.6275Line 214.5214.6112.7325At the moment when I produced the data it didnt interpret the data into what I wanted to know bu t I could find using the spreadsheet so first decided to find the percentage error of each group again using the calculation shown in the preliminary testing this was(difference between original and average estimates / actual size/length)* 100But first we thought that in the data there may be rogue results these are called outliers and are values that do not follow the data in a reasonable trend and so can be eliminated using a certain formula that creates upper and lower fences and if values fall outside of these two fences they can be classed as outliers and will be dismissed from the data . To implement this formula we need to find the upper and lower quartiles of the data, so by using Microsoft excel this data was found. The formula to find upper and lower fences to eliminate outliers is as follows:Lower Fence = Lower quartile 1.5 * inter quartile rangeUpper Fence = Upper quartile + 1.5 * inter quartile rangeFrom this we gained our upper and lower fences which wereYear 10Upper FenceLower fenceAngle 173.537.5Angle 2190110Line 15.51.625Line 222.37.7Then we did the same for year 7Year 7Upper FenceLower fenceAngle 192.532.5Angle 220585Line 17.251.25Line 219.57.5And for the adultsAdultsUpper FenceLower fenceAngle 16533Angle 2188.75110.75Line 15.51.625Line 26.87517.675With this data we deleted rogue values which amounted only to three.So now we can find the percentage error without worrying about rogue values influencing what could be a vital difference.Year 10 (%)Year 7 (%)Adults (%)Angle 17.218.96.8Angle 27.99.035.12Line 14.6232Line 216.1716.881.9This gives us an idea of to which group is better at estimating the sizes of angles and the lengths of lines but to see this in another way we can use box plots which are very useful for comparing sets of data from different groups within a certain population. The length of the whiskers can give an indication of how the data is skewed, either positively or negatively. Also the true value can be marked on to compare e ach of the medians to each other. By looking at the box plots , more specifically where the quartiles are marked we can see whether people tended to over estimate or under estimate. If the median is inclined slightly towards the upper quartile then people in that group under estimated more often than not and vice versa.So here are some box plots that compare all the age groups at both angles and lines.From this we see that the adults mean value is closer to the actual value of both angle 1 and angle 2 plus both the values of lines 1 and 2 ,this provides even more evidence to suggest against my hypothesis that years 10 pupils have a better ability at estimating both angles and lines because we have seen this through a percentage error and several box plot diagrams that we gained from using the averages from different groups but to prove my second statement in the prediction that adults estimates would be closer to their mean answer, which effectively means that adults made similar es timates to each other than the year 10 and 7 pupils , I need to use a statistical device called standard deviation this measures the spread of values from the mean, the bigger the value the more the answers are spread from the mean.Angle 1Angle 2Line 1Line 2Year 1011200.952.5Year 715301.53Adults1019.512.4We see the adults standard deviation figure being the smallest for three out of the four categories which proves one of my hypothesis statements correct but the other wrong this is because It was more of a guess than a prediction.Over all the taking all statistical methods used I came to the conclusion that adults were actually better at estimating both angles but it was interesting to see that the adults guesses had a small deviation from the mean (standard deviation) . The year 10 pupils by my calculations were second best ,their percentage errors were either very close to the adults in two out of four cases or dramatically a field from the other angle and line like the other two cases but their was a link between the angle and the line that were quite a bit out from the adult counterparts they were both the larger angles and lines using this information this could of provided another route of investigation to follow but then their was a factor preventing this being time and also looking at the year 7 data they were exactly the opposite to year ten pupils , where as they tended to be further out on the larger values of angle 2 and line 2 ,year 7 tended to be further out on the smaller sets of angle 1 and line 1 so their could have been a connection between this data and their ages or maybe gender but time did not permit us to investigate these fields.If I could reiterate the experiment I would make a more detailed hypothesis inducing me to analyse all possible fields that could of affected a persons ability to estimate the size of angles and lengths of lines an example of this is gender or intelligence but the field that I investigated which was age came out to me with a very clear result , this was that on average the older you are the better you are at estimating the size of an angle and the length of a line ,but we must take into account that we used a random sample of 25% from each group this meant that we could of missed some peoples estimates that could of affected or swayed the results to a different conclusion this could be important. This means the concluding statement may not actually be correct if further investigated with more detail and with more age groups such as year 8 , 9 and 11 but is still correct for the investigation we carried out.

Friday, March 20, 2020

Zomato Essays

Zomato Essays Zomato Essay Zomato Essay Users reviews are what attracts people to enter Combat, creating a networking effect PEST Analysis Political Economical ; Certain countries, like China, have rigid laws about forbidding foreign websites to be accessed in the mainland ; Crisis people want to be more aware of their pending and prefer to browse first (check for price ranges) ; Crisis hit the restaurant sector hard, restaurants need to make the most of any marketing tool available Social Technological ; Tendency to want to be in, people want to know which are the most trendy places ; Increased number of people with smartness and access to APS (85 billion APS downloaded from July 2008 to October 2014 in the Apple store, source:Satanist) ; People are becoming more and more trustworthy of the reviews of real users Market Trends Today Educated consumer Businesses traditional marketing tools arent enough Consumer cares about: other peoples opinion Market trends some data 88% read reviews to determine the quality off local business 39% read reviews on a regular basis Restaurants and cafes are the businesses that most search more for reviews (source: Bright Local) 72% of consumers say that positive reviews make them trust a local business more 88% of consumers say they trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations Competitors worldwide Among hotels, rentals and flights, Transistor also has a restaurant browser with reviews and ratings Google Maps now also features restaurant search aggregating information and ratings associated with the acquired website GATE Yelp is a business search engine (restaurants represents 42% of the content) that has a social network component to it Foursquare works as a city guide providing personalized recommendations to the users An online city guide that provides information about businesses in several categories, restaurants being one of them Competitors in Portugal The site features the most comprehensive database of Portuguese tourism resources, not forgetting restaurants (description, pictures, price ranges, etc. ) Best tables is a platform Of dinning reservations with a lot information about restaurants Lisbon is a comprehensive guide/showcase of the best of the city of Lisbon, including bars and restaurants Differential Analysis Competitors Transistor Regional availability (no of countries) Number of unique monthly views Languages Number Of App number of platforms 45 MUM 30 MUM 4 MUM 28 8 15 MUM MUM :erasure MUM 12 MUM 3 Cityscapes 1 (USA) MM 2 20 MUM 6 62. M Google Maps Yelp Combat Porter 5 Forces Threat of new entrants Bargaining power of suppliers Competition and rivalry Threat of substitutes nonusers High threat of new entrants: new entrants 1. No legal barriers 2. Low sunk costs 3. Low cost of advertisement on the internet promote their business Low bargaining power of suppliers: easy for new entrants to 1 . Restaurants arent able to negotiate with Combat over what information is shown on their page. High bargaining power of consumers: 1 . Low switching costs 2. The existence of Combat depends on the reviews and ratings of the users, the consumers help build the service provided High threat of substitutes: 1 . Substantial amount of companies who do basically the same thing as 2. Switching costs arent high, consumers can get information from other sites or even magazines and city guides 3. With the development of technology, it is very easy for anyone to create a website of online reviews High competition ; Many competitors with good brand awareness offering generally the same service; ; On-line reviews websites are pretty easy to create ; Switching costs are generally low Opportunity: The specialization of Combat in the restaurants sector can make people who are looking for a place to eat/drink more trustful of Samoss data and information comparing with its competitors. This happens because Samoss team concentrates its energy in providing the best possible service of that one (and only) segment. Samoss positioning inside porter 5 forces ; Combat should add some special features to the platform to create more switching costs ; Combat should broader the geographical presence but always taking in mind the quality of the information provided ; The fact that Combat has price ranges and scanned menus is a good differentiator factor which makes them stand out from other competitors Combat inside web 2. 0 ; Web 2. 0 designates World Wide Web sites that emphasize exaggerated intent, which is the case of Combat. ; Combat is only possible because of user generated content, since it is based on the reviews Of its users. ; The platform also allows users to create their own food diaries and share their experiences with friends. ; This relationship that users have with Combat makes them more loyal to the platform, which ends up being a switching cost. Value creation McFarland Matrix Strategic -> Agreements with some restaurants to operational the home-delivery meals (food-ordering being the current long-term strategic goal of Combat) Potential -> Partnerships with relevant impasses (they could partner up with Best tables like they did with Bookstall in K) Operational Tracking of the online reviews -> Local teams to conquer more restaurants to the listings Us port ->Weekly reports to the listed restaurants about their page visitors/reviews Value chain Support Activities ; Human Resource Management the website has a list of all the available jobs according to country and position. The website has a blob which contains analysis posted by Mr.. Soya, sharing current events and strategies of the company, which help Combat sharing their vision to clients and investors. It is also available an inbox and a local telephone number where customers can leave opinions about the service. ; Technology will assist the company on their operation s, strategy and innovation. Customers post their reviews soon after their experience. Assist clients deciding each place better suits their food preferences. Clients are able to find which restaurants are closer to the desired location . Procurement Combat has its own team for approaching new restaurants and negotiate their entrance on the website. Sometimes, the opposite happens and are the restaurants that approach the company to negotiate their entrance. Primary Activities ; Inbound logistics Combat looks for potential restaurants that believe figuring in the website can be beneficial for both. All the information is hold on a virtual data-base. ; Operations -Combat collects information about the restaurants (price range, location, food type, in order to provide clients with the most information possible to figurate on the website. ; Outbound logistics the collected information is arranged by category to better suit the customers needs.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Having a Job in High School Has More Benefits Than Just a Paycheck

Having a Job in High School Has More Benefits Than Just a Paycheck SAT / ACT Prep Online Guides and Tips Having a job used to be a rite of passage for high school students. They’d put in some hours during the school year and over the summer and often be able to pay for most of their college expenses with the money they earned.However, as today’s current high schoolers are facing piles of homework, pressure to excel on sports teams and clubs, and tuition costs that no entry-level job could ever cover, many people are rethinking the concept of high schoolers working. Are there still benefits to having a job in high school?Yes. There are many reasons for a high school student today to have a job, and those benefits extend far beyond just a paycheck. Having a job in high school can not only be a great experience in and of itself, it can also set you up to get even better jobs in college and beyond.In this article, I use my experience of working as a teenager to go over the key benefits of having a high school job. I also end by giving tips on the best jobs for high school students. My High School Work Experience When I was 14 years old, my mother told me that I needed to get a job in order to pay for college. Happy with my sporadic babysitting work, I resisted and told my mother that, no matter what job I got, I’d never be able to pay for college on a high school worker’s salary. To prove my point, I even got a calculator and showed her it’d take several years of full-time work on a minimum wage salary to cover college costs. My mother dismissed those arguments and told me that there were plenty of other reasons why I should get a job beyond just the paycheck. So I found myself applying for and eventually accepting a job as a swim instructor and lifeguard at my town’s local pool.I ended up working at the pool through all four years of high school and eventually was promoted to a manager position. In the summer, I’d teach swim lessons in the morning and lifeguard in the afternoon, and during the school year I’d teach swim lessons weekend mornings and supervise the office occasional weekday evenings. Not everything about the job was great, and there were times I hated jumping in the pool on cold mornings and trying to convince cranky kids to follow my instructions, but overall, like my mother said, I got many benefits from the job beyond just the paycheck (although having spending money of my own was definitely nice). At my job, I made lots of new friends, more than I had made in high school actually. I also gained numerous skills including CPR training and office experience.Additionally, I was also able to use my work experience (as well as my experience as a manager) to stand out from other job applicants in college and get a paid research job as a freshman in college. Having a job in high school gave me work experience, independence, and a better idea of the type of career I wanted, and many other high school students can benefit from having a job.Even if the job doesn’t pay well, or relate to your future career, or seem all that fun, there are still tons of benefits to having a high school job, and we’ll go over them in this article. The 6 Key Benefits of High School Jobs There are numerous benefits to getting a job in high school, some of which are obvious and others less so. This section covers six of the main benefits you can expect to get from having a job as a high school student. #1: You’ll Earn Money The most obvious benefit to getting a job in high school is that you’ll be making money. Now, since you’re starting at the bottom rung of the ladder, this likely won’t be a ton of money. When I first started working, I made the princely sum of $5.25 an hour (before taxes), and that’s not going to make anyone rich. However, even the salaries of low-paying jobs begin to add up over time, and since you’re in high school, your expenses are very low or non-existent. That means you can put all that money towards whatever you want, like a college fund or new clothes or attending concerts, instead of having to pay bills and students loans. My parents recommended that I put half my paychecks in my savings account, so I did that and used the other half to buy an expensive guitar that I could have never have afforded without my job.And even if your high school job is an unpaid internship or volunteer work, not to worry. There are plenty of other benefits of a high school job, which we discuss below. #2: You’ll Learn New Skills No matter what your first job is, even if it seems incredibly easy and/or incredibly boring, you’re guaranteed to pick up skills you didn’t have before.These skills can include anything from learning how to work a cash register, to building customer service skills, to figuring out the trick to balancing all those restaurant dishes on your arms at once. The skills you learn may not be that interesting to you, and they may not be anything close to the skills you need for your future career, but it never hurts to gain new knowledge. It may end up being interesting or useful to you down the line. At my job, I learned how to teach different swimming strokes, how to administer CPR, and a host of first-aid skills. These are all pretty helpful to know, however; I didn’t end up using most of them in my future jobs. The main skill that was useful for other jobs I had down the line was learning how to use a pretty obscure computer program to track pool visitor numbers. It was clunky and annoying to learn, but, years later, I applied to an internship that also used the same program, and my future boss told me that having that random skill helped me beat out the competition and get the job. So don’t knock any of the skills your job teaches you because they may come in handy someday. #3: You’ll Gain Work Experience In addition to learning new skills, your high school job will help you gain valuable work experience. Everyone goes through a learning curve when they first begin working as they learn how to manage their time effectively, how to interact with coworkers, how to make sure they get to work on time, etc. No matter what other strengths you have, you’re going to be a pretty bad employee until you figure those basic work skills out. This is why a lot of employers are hesitant to hire someone who’s never worked before, even if they have great grades and otherwise seem like they could be an excellent worker. A few months after I started working, my job had a mandatory meeting one night that every employee had to go to. However, I didn’t go because, for some reason, I didn’t believe it was really mandatory or important for me to attend that meeting. Afterwards, I got a stern talking to from my boss and it was embarrassing, but it’s better to make those mistakes early on, when the stakes are low and your boss is more likely to be understanding. By college, with four years of work experience under my belt, I definitely wasn’t making those beginner mistakes during my research job. So, even if your high school work experience only amounts to flipping burgers for a summer at your local fast food joint, that can still give you a huge leg up over people with no work experience when you apply to jobs in college and later on. If you start learning the skills to being a good employee in high school, you’ll set yourself up to be an outstanding employee later on down the line. So make your mistakes now instead of later (but don’t make the same mistake I did because that was pretty dumb of me). #4: You’ll Learn More About What Kind of Career You Want As a high school student, you’ve likely spent a lot of time thinking about the type of career you want to have, even if you haven’t come to any firm conclusions about what you want to do. Thinking about and researching different types of jobs is great, but the best way to figure out what you want to do is to actually try different jobs out. Now, your high school job likely isn’t the job you want to get after you finish school, but it’s still a great way to get a taste of the working world and figure out which things you enjoy in a job and which you don’t. When I was a teenager, I was pretty sure I was going to be a scientific researcher and possibly a professor. That career had nothing to do with my high school job of teaching swim lessons and being a lifeguard. However, I was able to use my high school work experience to get a better idea of what kind of job I would enjoy. One of the best ways to do this was to think about what I liked and what I didn’t like about my high school job. Things I liked included being around people, being active and outside, and working with kids. Things I disliked included knowing I was responsible for the safety of everyone in the pool, giving kids low marks on their swimming tests, and dealing with parents who were angry their child didn’t pass to the next swim level. None of this radically changed my career goals, but it did encourage me to consider having a job that let me do more than just sit at a desk or in a lab, and it made me think more critically about being a professor, where I’d regularly have to give out low grades and speak with unhappy students and parents. #5: You’ll Meet New People Unless your high school job involves sorting old moss specimens in a warehouse by yourself (a job I also once had), you’ll meet lots of new people at work.Your coworkers will likely be people you wouldn’t have met otherwise, which is a great way to expand your social circle beyond your high school friends and learn more about different types of people. Many workplaces that employ high school students have a lot of similarly-aged people working there who often develop a strong camaraderie, which means your new coworkers could end up being some of your best friends. However, there’s also the possibility that you won’t like someone you work with, whether this is your boss, customers you need to help, or that one coworker who steals everyone else’s lunch. And even though that’s not as fun as being friends with everyone you work with, it’ll help prepare you for the many times in the future you have to work with or interact with someone you’re not crazy about. #6: You’ll Gain Independence One of the most important benefits of teenager jobs is that you’ll achieve a degree of independence you likely haven’t experienced before.As a high school student, you’ve probably lived your entire life with your parents and been under their rules or your school’s rules when you’re in class. At a job, you’re deemed responsible enough to manage your own duties, and you’ll have fewer restrictions than you likely do at home or school. As an employee, you’re not just a student or a kid; you’re a full-fledged member of the team who’s considered smart enough to handle some responsibility. Your teacher won’t be there to tell you to stop talking and pay attention, and your mom won’t be there to remind you to clean up after yourself. You’ll be responsible for taking care of all your job duties yourself. Some people worry that teenagers who have jobs give up their childhood too soon and take on too much responsibility, but in my experience and the experience of my friends who worked as teenagers, I never found this to be true.My job, even when I worked full-time in the summer, still gave me plenty of time to socialize and have fun, and I was proud to feel more â€Å"grown up† and know I was trusted by my boss to do my job well. Succeeding at a job and earning moneyall on your owncan help you gain a lot of independence and self-confidence, and it’s a great way to help prepare you for college and the future when your responsibilities and independence will only increase. What Are the Best Jobs for Teens? Sometimes high school students and their parents worry about what the â€Å"best† job for a teenager to have is or if the job they’re thinking about taking is good enough.The truth is that most teenager jobs are about the same prestige-wise. Working as a waitress is no better or worse than working in customer service or at a summer camp. Each of those jobs can provide the benefits we discussed in this article. No one is expecting a high schooler to get a job as an investment banker or astrophysicist, so don’t worry about a job that doesn’t seem like it’s â€Å"good enough.† Many rich and successful people starting out flipping burgers or folding clothes at their local mall. Ditto to people concerned about getting a job in high school that matches the career they want to have. If you can find a job as a high school student that’s in the field you eventually want to work in, that’s great, but be aware most high schoolers take jobs that have absolutely nothing to do with their career paths. That’s OK since your career goals are likely to change between high school and when you actually begin working full-time. The most important thing is just to get a job so you can get the work experience, new skills and added sense of responsibility. It’s OK if you don’t think the pay is that great or the job isn't something you’re really interested in. My first job paid very little and had nothing to do with my career goals, but I still got a lot out of it. If possible, I’d recommend an â€Å"official† job as opposed to under the table work like nannying since the former gives you more experience with common workplace tasks like clocking in and out, attending meetings, and working with managers and coworkers. These are all things you’ll probably need to know for future jobs, so it’s good to start getting used to them now.Workplaces known for treating young and new workers well are also a good bet. Finally, when you’re looking at jobs, make sure they’re convenient for you to get to and will work with your schedule. You don’t want to take a job only to find out a few weeks later that it conflicts with a sport or club you're in. Conclusion: The Benefits of High School Jobs Having a job is not for every high school student; many teenagers these days already have jam-packed schedules between school and sports and clubs. As a junior in high school, I had to cut back on my job hours during the school year because I was feeling overwhelmed with homework.However, for many high school students, there are numerous benefits to be gained by having a job. Not only will high school jobs give you a way to earn some money, meet new people, and gain some more responsibility, you can use your teenager jobs to get yourself a better job in college since can prove to employers you’ve already succeeded at one job. Some people wonder what the best jobs for teens are, but the truth is that any job with a decent boss, fair pay, and work that isn’t too miserable can get you all the benefits we discussed in this article. The most important step is just to go out there and find yourself a job. What's Next? Looking for job ideas?We've written a guide onthe eight best jobs for teensas well as steps to take to find the best job for you. Thinking about getting an internship?We've got you covered! Check out our step-by-step guide to getting an internship for teens for everything you need to know to land a top-notch internship. Looking to save your hard-earned earnings from your high school job? Check out our guides to saving money on the SAT and ACT. Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points or your ACT score by 4 points?We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now: